Dear Dr. T,

Do you have any experience using cefadroxil for centralized pain? I looked into IV ketamine treatment two years ago (a local psychiatrist treats depression with it, but also has some pain patients). At $1000 a pop three times a week for 3-4 weeks, it was too rich for my blood. However, the doctor said he also prescribes cefadroxil along with ketamine. It sounded goofy, but cheap and relatively safe, so I tried it. He cited one case report of a woman with CRPS who responded when treated for a UTI. The pain returned after the antibiotic course was complete. They stopped and started several times and ultimately, she was taken off everything but that and did well for three years. I have had a substantial reduction in opiate dose and each time I miss doses of cefadroxil for more than a few days, the pain worsens significantly. I can’t find much on line except that one case report. Apparently, it disrupts glutamine metabolism in the bacteria, which kills them. I’m not sure what it does in pain patients, but since glutamine imbalance causes pain, it must be related. I’m interested to hear if you have read about this or tried it. N

ANSWER

Dear N,

I’m not surprised but delighted to hear about your experience with cefadroxil. As a matter of fact, I have considerable interest in your experience. First, some years ago, some antibiotics were given to lumbar pain patients and they got better. The writers suggested that certain back pain patients must have disc infections as the cause of their pain. No other explanation was ever forthcoming until minocycline was found in several studies to suppress neuroinflammation caused by glial cell activation. Minocycline is now used occasionally for painful conditions and the mechanism of activation is believed to be anti-neuroinflammation. Unfortunately, minocycline tends to have side-effects and few patients tolerate long-term use. The other antibiotic that has been used is chlarythronycin. I had some patients who reduce their pain in the 50% range with a daily dose of chlarythronycin. You are the first I have heard of relative to cefadroxil. This is a good, safe antibiotic. I’ll try to remember to send you some references. Incidentally, my latest recommendation for a one-month trial is Deer Antler Velvet. Sounds “nuts” but it’s not. It contains several anabolic hormones and growth factors.

As ever, Forest Tennant

Happy New Year Dr. Tennant,

I want to thank you for your quick response on your web page regarding my low pregnenolone level as I have ordered the pregnenolone capsules. At that time I hadn’t received my Cortisol level, which is 1.6 ug/dL and normal levels are 4.3ug/dL to 22.4 ug/dL and they were drawn at 10:30am. What medication would you give your patients for that? Thank you for your time with me, I appreciate you. Thanks, DA

ANSWER

Dear DA,

The fact that your pregnenolone and cortisol levels are low tells me you have a very active neuroinflammatory process in your central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). I assume you have constant pain. I highly recommend bovine adrenal extract (250 mg or more capsules). Instructions are on the bottle. Obtain bovine adrenal extract at your health food store or internet. There are several good brands. Just make sure the label says adrenal extract with a dose of 250 mg or more. If you can’t raise your cortisol blood level with the “real McCoy”, ask your physician to prescribe low dose Medrol®. What are you doing for pain relief? Besides replenishing your hormones, you need to control your cause (pain) that is driving your hormones down.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant Dr. Tennant,

Firstly, let me start by explaining the reason why I’m emailing you. My wife has been suffering with chronic pain which has been increasing in intensity for the past 10 years and was recently diagnosed with Fibromyalgia. My wife is 26 and we have 4 children. During the pregnancies we have noticed that the Fibromyalgia as a whole subsides, no insomnia, nothing. So I decided to research for some kind of explanation as to why this happens and that’s how I came across your work and research. I believe that the increased HCG is what caused the relief my wife experiences during pregnancy, because around 3-6 weeks after birth and after the hormones start to settle, her pains came back along with insomnia and memory loss due to fibromyalgia. My main aim of emailing you is to find if your research and work with using HCG injections to relieve symptoms is still proving effective? We are based in the UK and struggling to find a solution not involving opioids and other typical pain relief methods. I look forward to your reply.

Yours sincerely, LT

ANSWER

Dear LT,

HCG is one of the hormones that the body uses to relieve pain and grow nerve tissue. Your wife’s history is well-known to occur in that pain subsides during pregnancy. I continue to use HCG and find remarkable success with it. Not only does HCG raise the body’s levels of estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone, it has an anabolic/neuroregeneration component. I believe every severe chronic pain patient should have a 2-month trial of HCG as it brings some long-term relief and recovery to most patients.

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant

ANSWER

Dr. Tennant,

I had all the hormone labs drawn like you recommended for my diagnosis of severe Arachnoiditis. Only one test was abnormal. Pregnenolone was only 11ng/dl (normal results at our lab are 22 – 237 my/dL). Would you please give me your suggestions to what hormone you would be treating your patient with for this level? Thank you as I appreciate your input so much. DA

ANSWER

Dear DA,

A low pregnenolone indicates that your disease is using up and requiring more pregnenolone than your nervous system can make. Pregnenolone is critical to control the neuroinflammation of arachnoiditis including the pain it may produce. The basic function of pregnenolone is to do the following: (1) suppress neuroinflammation and (2) promote neuroregeneration (“anabolic effect”). You can Purchase pregnenolone capsules in 50 or 100 mg dosage. Start at only 50 to 100 mg a day and work up your dosage to 200 to 400 mg a day. Once you feel you have stabilized you can maintain on pregnenolone on an every-other day basis or every day at a dose between 100 and 200 mg. In some intractable pain patients, pregnenolone has been their key to significant relief and recovery and a new life!!

Best wishes, Forest Tennant

Good evening Dr Tennant ~

13 years ago, at a medical pain meeting, I approached you for additional information about hormones and pain. I was seeking answers. After decades it was clear that pain treatment was missing something big. (other than a diagnosis, pain being the symptom). Because of your specialty you looked outside the box. I have a small practice for patients who have failed most common procedures and treatments. Since that day I have treated many patients with the information you provide, and I think you would be pleased at some of the successes. I knew that persistent pain seemed to overwhelm the neuroendocrine system: deplete GABA, over-stimulate the feedback systems, etc. I also knew that opiates and other adjunctive medication for a pain syndrome did much the same, with more significant psychological and social issues. I am still looking for solutions. Your bulletins have been invaluable Please continue the good work. If you ever teach a seminar, class, or provide advanced information, I would appreciate any direction you would give. My practice is small, and I am in the last third of my career.  Dr. C

ANSWER

Dear Dr. C,

Thanks for your kind and most welcome note. I wish all practicing physicians understood intractable, severe pain as do you. To me the most critical basic science research of the past decade which explains, and guides treatment of the severe intractable pain patient are: 1. severe, constant intractable pain is caused by activated glial cells and neuroinflammation; 2. the CNS uses specific hormones such as pregnenolone and HCG to protect neurons and promote neurogenesis. My approach to treating severe intractable pain is to control neuroinflammation, promote neurogenesis, and provide symptomatic pain relief with opioids as a last resort. I’m big on low dose naltrexone, oxytocin, ketamine, ad PEA (palmitoylethanolamide).

Best wishes always, Forest Tennant